Friday, July 30, 2010

#1: Alfred Hitchcock


- “Give them pleasure - the same pleasure they have when they wake up from a nightmare.”

Perhaps it's a cop-out, or maybe I should just delay this posting as I did Billy Wilder's entry, but after the miserable week I have had I am just going forward now. As you'll notice, this is not a completely written out entry as all of the others have been. I had every entry to done well in advance, except for Hitch's, assuming that I would write it this week while posting the first two runners-up. Then I got sick to start the week and am only now beginning to feel human again. Even so, I'm still nowhere near 100% and have an energy level that is zapped very quickly.

Fortunately, though, there was not a whole lot of drama as to who #1 would be once Scorsese and Wilder were off the board. I've waxed lyrical about my love for a number of different Hitchcock films (Rebecca, Rear Window, Psycho), so I'll direct folks there if they want some more in-depth analysis. What I will add is that I tried to play out scenarios where the obvious choice of Hitchcock at #1 wouldn't happen... and I just couldn't do it. He has too many films that I love, a filmography too deep to be matched. I still need to better familiarize myself with his earlier British period, which will likely just increase my love of the Master of Suspense.

Once again, I apologize to end the series like this, but I'm assuming most everyone will understand. The important thing is that I'm on the mend and that everyone can now post their favorite Hitch lists!

1. Rear Window (1954)
2. Psycho (1960)
3. Rebecca (1940)
4. Vertigo (1958)
5. Strangers on a Train (1951)
6. Shadow of a Doubt (1943)
7. Dial M for Murder (1954)
8. I Confess (1953)
9. North by Northwest (1959)
10. Notorious (1946)
11. The Lady Vanishes (1938)
12. The Birds (1963)
13. Foreign Correspondent (1940)
14. Frenzy (1972)
15. Marnie (1964)
16. To Catch a Thief (1955)
17. Blackmail (1929)
18. The Thirty-Nine Steps (1935)
19. Suspicion (1941)
20. Spellbound (1945)
21. Rope (1948)
22. Saboteur (1942)
23. Lifeboat (1944)
24. The Wrong Man (1956)
25. The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)
26. The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)
27. Stage Fright (1950)
28. Torn Curtain (1966)

34 comments:

  1. Dave, congratulations on the completion of your admirable project. Surely no director has given more pleasure to the movie lover than Hitch in his more than four decades of splendid work (and that's not even including the TV shows). What more can I say about Hitchcock except to offer my own list of favorites?

    1. North by Northwest (1959)--my favorite movie ever
    2. Vertigo (1958)
    3. Rear Window (1954)
    4. Strangers on a Train (1951)
    5. Psycho (1960)
    6. Notorious (1946)
    7. Foreign Correspondent (1940)
    8. Rebecca (1940)
    9. The Lady Vanishes (1938)
    10. The 39 Steps (1935)

    For me these are his greatest works, but the following are nearly as good, all of them tremendously entertaining films with many memorable moments: Young and Innocent, Suspicion, Shadow of a Doubt, To Catch a Thief, The Man Who Knew Too Much (the 1956 version, which I've come to prefer to the earlier version), The Wrong Man (his most underappreciated film), The Birds (one that took awhile to grow on me but that I now love), Frenzy. I also like several others but not as much as the ones I've named. It's interesting that his most fecund and consistent decade was the 1950s, from Strangers on a Train to Psycho, during which he produced my top 5 and almost half of my nearlies.

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  2. No donut for Lynch, eh?

    Terrific choice. I think there are many more people who'd rank him where you have.

    I've not seen many of his works, but what I've seen are all masterpieces:

    Rear Window, Vertigo, Psycho, The Birds, Lifeboat, Rope, North by Northwest and 39 Steps

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  3. I somehow missed commenting to your post on Billy Wilder, even though he happens to be one of my favourites too. Anyway, Hitchcock certainly isn't a surprising choice for the top post. He may not be the best director according to me, but there's no doubting the fact that I fall in the minority group insofar as my opinion goes.

    Anyway, here's my Hitchcock top 5:
    1. Psycho
    2. Rear Window
    3. Vertigo
    4. Strangers on a Train
    5. Birds

    Interestingly, Psycho is the only Hitchcock movie that will consistently make my favourites list.


    Anyway, my 30 favourite directors, in no particular order, are:

    Satyajit Ray (Ind)
    Mrinal Sen
    Rituparno Ghosh
    Hrishikesh Mukherjee
    Charlie Chaplin (US)
    Martin Scorsese
    Billy Wilder
    Stanley Kubrick
    Woody Allen
    Coen Bros.
    Quentin Tarantino
    Francis Ford Coppola
    Robert Siodmak
    David Cronenberg (Can)
    Jean-Luc Godard (Fra)
    Francois Truffaut
    Akira Kurosawa (Jap)
    Wong Kar-Wai (HK)
    Park Chan-Wook (S.Kor)
    Kim Ki-Duk
    Milos Forman (Czh)
    Jiri Menzel
    Sergio Leone (Ita)
    Bernardo Bertolucci
    Federico Fellini
    Krzysztof Kieslowski (Pol)
    Roman Polanski
    Guillermo Del Toro (Mex)
    Lars von Trier (Den)
    Ingmar Bergman (Swe)

    It was an impromptu list, so I might have missed out on some names. I'd also like to figure out the ranking for my list sometime.

    It was a pleasure following this series as it has been following all your series. Hoping that you hit upon an idea for your next project asap ;)

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  4. First Dave I hope you feel better soon. It sounds like you have had a rough week. As I mentioned in the Wilder post Hitchcock is one of my top three. He and Wilder are the first directors I ever became aware of when I first started to take an interest in film as a young teenager.

    It was really tough putting these in some kind of order as I admire so many of his films. Even in his lesser works there is much to admire. I still need to tackle most of his silents.

    Rear Window
    Psycho
    North by Northwest
    Notorious
    Suspicion
    The 39 Steps
    Strangers on a Train
    Vertigo
    Rebecca
    Dial M for Murder
    Shadow of a Doubt
    Foreign Correspondent
    The Lady Vanishes
    Frenzy
    Spellbound
    The Birds
    Marnie
    Rope
    Saboteur
    Sabotage
    To Catch a Thief
    Lifeboat
    The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)
    The Wrong Man
    The Man Who Knew too Much (1934)
    The Lodger
    The Trouble with Harry
    Stage Fright
    I Confess
    Mr. and Mrs. Smith
    Stage Fright
    Family Plot
    Torn Curtain
    Topaz

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  5. Good ol' Hitch. I dig so many of his films and was actually just rewatching REAR WINDOW again a few days. Such a great film. here are my faves:

    1. Rear Window
    2. The Birds
    3. Psycho
    4. Vertigo
    5. Strangers on a Train
    6. Shadow of a Doubt
    7. North by Northwest
    8. The Man Who Knew Too Much
    9. To Catch a Thief
    10. Dial M for Murder
    11. Spellbound

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  6. Dave: I would like to simultaneously congratulate you on the completion of this spectacular, epic journey examining (and celebrating) the geniuses who brought the cinema to its highest level of artistry, and to hope that you are feeling better today. I know you have had a difficult period this past week, making for a lamentable state of affairs with the conclusion of the countdown. By way of enthusiasm, passion and volume (and quality) of comments you may have staged your greatest triumph here, and I know just how many hours you have invested into the enterprise by way of tireless home viewing and writing.
    Your #1 choice here is one that virtually no true cineaste could ever contest. Hitch's prolific output is unmatched by any major director dating back to the silent era, and his work for television made his contributions of the yeoman variety. He produced as many truly "great" films as anyone else, and was one of the most influential directors of all time. His body of work is perfect material for a film festival, and his career had at least three major peaking points, including that spurt of creativity in the UK in the 30's, where he launched his craft. Numerically listing his films (as John stated) is rather an arbitrary persuit, as one might feel different tomorrow, but it's at least a way to gage present regard:

    1 Vertigo
    2 Psycho
    3 Rear Windown
    4 Rebecca
    5 The Lady Vanishes
    6 Notorious
    7 I Confess
    8 Shadow of a Doubt
    9 The 39 Steps
    10 Strangers on a Train
    11 Blackmail (1929)
    12 North by Northwest
    13 Spellbound
    14 The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)
    15 The Birds
    16 The Wrong Man
    17 Frenzy
    18 Lifeboat
    19 Suspicion
    20 Foreign Corresponent
    21 Dial M For Murder
    22 Rope
    23 Secret Agent
    24 The Lodger
    25 The Manzman
    26 The Ring
    27 Topaz
    28 Jamaica Inn
    29 The Paradine Case
    30 To Catch A Thief
    31 Saboteur
    32 Torn Curtain
    33 The Trouble With Harry
    34 Mr. and Mrs. Smith
    35 Family Plot
    36 Stage Fright
    37 Under Capricorn

    As far as listing my own "favorite" Top 30 directors here, that is a task far more difficult than listing Hitch's best film in any kind of order. It is subject to change weekly, if not daily. As it is I have a first-place tie:

    1 Charles Chaplin and Ingmar Bergman
    2 Robert Bresson
    3 Yasujiro Ozu
    4 Carl Theodor Dreyer
    5 Kenji Mizoguchi
    6 Jean Renoir
    7 F. W. Murnau
    9 John Ford
    8 Powell and Pressburger
    9 Buster Keaton
    10 Luis Bunuel
    11 Satijit Ray
    12. K. Kieslowski
    13 Ernst Lubitsch
    14 Orson Welles
    15 Abel Gance
    16 Vittorio De Sica
    17 Anthony Mann
    18 Billy Wilder
    19 Andrei Tarkovsky
    20 Alfred Hitchcock
    21 Frank Capra
    22 Stanley Kubrick
    23 Billy Wilder
    24 Mikio Naruse
    25 Carol Reed
    26 Frantisek Vlacil
    27 Federico Fellini
    28 Preston Sturges
    29 Val Lewton (counted as a director here!)
    30 Howard Hawks

    So, I have 31 choices here with teh first-place tie.

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  7. Another great list comes to an end. Hitchcock is a good choice for number one. A prolific career with many worthy films to his credit. My top ten.....

    1. Vertigo
    2. Rear Window
    3. Psycho
    4. The Birds
    5. The Wrong Man (so underrated)
    6. Shadow Of A Doubt
    7. Notorious
    8. The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)
    9. Strangers On A Train
    10. Rebecca

    Just to spice this post up a little..... I consider North By Northwest to be an awful movie. I never understood what people saw in that film. I took a Hitchcock course in college where we watched about 15-16 of his pictures through the semester. The unintentional laughter that N By N produced spoke volumes.

    A list of 30 directors would be very hard to produce off the top of my head. I will refrain from trying. Good job Dave. Can't wait for your next project.....M.Roca

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  8. Actually, Ouseme Sembene, Fritz Lang, Jean-Pierre Melville, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Jacques Rivette Rainer Fassbinder,Roberto Rossellini, and Rene Clair would make this list prominently as well, though I am not sure what place until I do it all over again. But not a single one of that group can be left off. Goes to show you how faulty a quickly-composed list can be.

    I would pose some runners-up in no particular order:

    John Huston
    Luchino Visconti
    Ken Loach
    Bel Tarr
    Akira Kurosawa
    Jacques Rivette
    Martin Scorsese
    Wong Kar-Wei
    Lars Von Trier
    Francis Ford Coppola
    Steven Spielberg
    David Lean
    Todd Haynes
    David Lynch
    D.W. Griffith
    Francois Truffaut
    Victor Sjostrom
    Jean Vigo
    Marcel Carne
    Kon Ichikawa
    Pier Paulo Pasolini
    Kanedo Shindo
    Jane Campion
    Bruce Beresford
    A. Wajda
    Eric Rohmer
    Jean-Luc Godard
    Sergei Eisenstein
    V. Podovkin
    Jaques Feyder
    William Wyler
    Clair Denis
    J. Menzel
    Robert Siodmak
    Jacques Tourneur
    Elia Kazan

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  10. I might as well add to my previous comment a list of those in my own directors' pantheon (at the present):

    Ingmar Bergman
    Luis Buñuel
    Charles Chaplin
    Vittorio de Sica
    Sergei Eisenstein
    Federico Fellini
    John Ford
    Howard Hawks
    Alfred Hitchcock
    Buster Keaton
    Akira Kurosawa
    David Lean
    Ernst Lubitsch
    Terrence Malick
    Jean-Pierre Melville
    Kenji Mizoguchi
    Max Ophüls
    Yasujiro Ozu
    Roman Polanski
    Michael Powell
    Satyajit Ray
    Jean Renoir
    Jacques Tati
    François Truffaut
    Orson Welles

    I'd like to add that reading your posts on the subject has caused me to update my views on some directors and as a result this list has recently grown by four.

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  11. My ten favorite:

    Under Capricorn
    Vertigo
    Notorious
    Shadow Of A Doubt
    The Lady Vanishes
    North By Northwest
    The Birds
    Rear Window
    The Wrong Man
    Sabotage

    Under Capricorn is quite possibly the most underrated film ever (Sam's ranking is quite common). Shot by the greatest of all cinematographers and featuring Bergman's best performance, it's one of my favorite films, and completely incomparable to anything else.

    Thirty favorites of mine:

    Budd Boetticher
    Robert Bresson
    Charlie Chaplin
    Brian De Palma
    Claire Denis
    Aleksandr Dovzhenko
    Carl Theodor Dreyer
    John Ford
    Jean-Luc Godard
    Howard Hawks
    Monte Hellman
    Alfred Hitchcock
    Elem Klimov
    Charles Laughton
    Ernst Lubitsch
    Terrence Malick
    Anthony Mann
    Michael Mann
    Jean-Pierre Melville
    Kenji Mizoguchi
    Sam Peckinpah
    Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger
    Nicholas Ray
    Jean Renoir
    Jacques Rivette
    Preston Sturges
    Andrei Tarkovsky
    Jacques Tati
    Jean Vigo
    Josef von Sternberg

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  12. Dave,

    1. Vertigo (1958)
    2. Strangers on a Train (1951)
    3. Shadow of a Doubt (1943)
    4. The Lady Vanishes (1938)
    5. The Trouble with Harry (1955)
    6. The Birds (1963)
    7. Psycho (1960)
    8. North by Northwest (1959)
    9. Rear Window (1954)
    10. Notorious (1946)
    11. The 39 Steps (1935)
    12. Rebecca (1940)
    13. The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)
    14. The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)
    15. Foreign Correspondent (1940)
    16. Dial M for Murder (1954)
    17. Young and Innocent (1937)
    18. I Confess (1953)
    19. Stage Fright (1950)

    First, of course, comes concern for your health. Second, congratulations on completing this Herculean achievement. I first tested your waters when I came across the Woody Allen entry. I was impressed by the concept, by the presentation, by the succinct and knowledgeable introductions and by the quality of the comments. The civility surrounding disagreements was most agreeable. It was easy to be drawn in.

    Hitchcock makes perfect sense. I started going to movies when his American films were first shown. We grew together comfortably for almost two decades, until the French came along in the 1960s and told many of us what we already knew. (I first saw Vertigo November 9th, 1959 in Garmisch-Partenkirchen.)

    Then with the advent of VCRs, DVDs, Cable (TCM) and Netflix I was able to learn about the English part of his career that I had missed. Hence the whole before us.

    Quantity and quality, plus depth. One might delve into Vertigo and not resurface for some time. Truffaut said “There are always three or four films in a film of his.” I found putting my nineteen in order very difficult. That is a tribute to the filmmaker, not an indecisive nature on my part.

    I am inclined in these postings to relate incidents in my personal life to films I have seen. But Hitchcock is a tough sell. Spies, foreign intriguers, murderers, and psychotics have, fortunately, been beyond my pale. So I will settle for a locale. Hitchcock spent formative and productive years in Angel, Islington in his English period. And I have had the good fortune to spend a few months every year in the past decade in those precincts. I suspect Hitchcock and I might have hoisted flagons in some of the same pubs. Alas, not at the same time.

    Good work. Better health and, although I am usually averse to sequels, I must admit curiosity as to what may come next.

    Gerald

    My wife (Enola) interjects:

    1. Rear Window
    2. North by Northwest
    3. Vertigo
    4. The Lady Vanishes
    5. The Birds
    6. Psycho

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  13. I've really enjoyed reading all the postings in this countdown, although I haven't commented all that much because of lack of knowledge of many of the directors - I'll be referring back to your postings in the future as I hopefully fill in some of the gaps. My favourites by Hitchcock are probably 'Rebecca' and 'Notorious', romantic that I am, but there are many of his which I don't remember very well or haven't yet seen. Hope you feel better very soon, Dave, and many thanks for all your hard work in putting all this together.

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  14. Well, well, once again my lack of knowledge on the classic masters of cinema and their films shines, for I have only seen one Hitchcock (Rear Window). Anyways, congratulation for completing this impressive task and get well soon!

    Personally, I find it almost impossible to rank my favourite directors. I do however have some sort of holy trinity of filmmakers whose work have inspired me like no others, they are, in no particular order, : John Carpenter, Sergio Leone and Tsui Hark (why is he not at least as well known as his former partner John Woo is a complete mystery to me). Akira Kurosawa and Martin Scorsese are not too far behind.

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  15. Dave, watch some more movies and feel better knowing how much we enjoy your countdowns and surveys. This one's been great. I think I take Hitchcock for granted a little. I admire a lot of his films yet the man himself seems now like something out of folklore. He needs no advocates now, while naming my own favorites is in part an act of advocacy that just seems wasted on such a canonical figure. But ask me to list the greatest directors objectively and he'll come in fairly close to the top.

    Here's a top ten.

    1. Vertigo
    2. Rear Window
    3. The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)
    4. Psycho
    5. Shadow of a Doubt
    6. The 39 Steps
    7. North by Northwest
    8. Strangers on a Train
    9. Dial M for Murder
    10. The Birds

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  16. I'm shocked, shocked!

    Get well, Dave!


    Here's my own at-this-moment, why-the-hell-not list of favorite directors. Rankings be damned, I can't do it! It's in alphabetical order.

    Michelangelo Antonioni
    Ingmar Bergman
    Charles Chaplin
    Francis Ford Coppola
    Carl Theodor Dreyer
    Sergei Eisenstein
    Federico Fellini
    John Ford
    Jean-Luc Godard
    Michel Gondry
    Peter Greenaway
    Howard Hawks
    Alfred Hitchcock
    Elia Kazan
    Zhang Ke Jia
    Stanley Kubrick
    David Lean
    David Lynch
    Louis Malle
    The Maysles Brothers
    F.W. Murnau
    Yasujiro Ozu
    The Brothers Quay
    Nicholas Ray
    Jacques Rivette
    Eric Rohmer
    Martin Scorsese
    Steven Spielberg
    Andrei Tarkovsky
    Orson Welles

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  17. Great choice to finish off a great project. It seems to be fashionable these days to bash Hitchcock so I am pleased to see so much love here. If not in the top spot, he would certainly be in the top five for me. My ranking of Hitchcock's top ten pictures:
    1) Vertigo
    2) Rear Window
    3) Psycho
    4) Strangers on a Train
    5) The Lady Vanishes
    6) Shadow of a Doubt
    7) The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)
    8) North By Northwest
    9) The 39 Steps
    10)Notorious

    And there are many other worthy ones like Frenzy, The Birds, Rebecca, The Trouble with Harry, and the underrated Jamaica Inn.

    Thanks again for a great series and I hope you are feeling better!

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  18. ok, here is my list though not definitive for sure. The top five are solid though the order may change between the first two gentlemen.

    Alfred Hitchcock
    Billy Wilder
    Martin Scorsese
    Woody Allen
    Roman Polanski
    Brian DePalma
    Charles Chaplin
    Francis Ford Coppola
    Elia Kazan
    Jean-Pierre Melville
    Robert Siodmak
    John Ford
    Howard Hawks
    Buster Keaton
    Fritz Lang
    Anthony Mann
    Nick Ray
    Sam Fuller
    John Huston
    Steven Spielberg
    Orson Welles
    Sam Peckinpah
    Michael Curtiz
    Joel & Ethan Coen
    Francois Truffaut
    Stanley Kubrick
    Victoria DeSica
    Joseph H. Lewis

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  19. Top Ten Hitch:

    Shadow of a Doubt
    Rear Window
    Vertigo
    The Lady Vanishes
    North by Northwest
    Spellbound
    Notorious
    Rebecca
    Sabotage
    Rope

    Top Ten Directors:

    Stanley Kubrick
    David Lynch
    Martin Scorsese
    Carl T. Dreyer
    Terrence Malick
    Fritz Lang
    Alfred Hitchcock
    Roman Polanski
    Ingmar Bergman
    Henri Georges-Clouzot

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  20. I confess (sorry, bad pun) that I'm indifferent to 'Rear Window'. I find it the stagiest, most artificial of Hitch's films (more so, even, than 'Rope'). Also, I'd place the original 'Man Who Knew Too Much' considerably higher than the lachrymose and by-the-numbers remake.

    My personal ranking:

    1. Shadow of a Doubt
    2. North by Northwest
    3. Psycho
    4. Vertigo
    5. The Lady Vanishes
    6. The 39 Steps
    7. Frenzy
    8. The Trouble with Harry
    9. The Birds
    10. Foreign Correspondent

    The challenge of picking one's top ten favourite directors is incredibly difficult. I don't see how you can factor in anyone still working. How do you rank, say, Terrence Malick (four movies, all of them masterful) against, say, Sidney Lumet (fifty-odd movies, half a dozen of them bona fide classics?

    Can you honestly call it until said director is dead and an objective evaluation of the body of work they left behind can be made? Allowing for this, my top ten directors are:

    1. Sam Peckinpah
    2. Powell & Pressburger
    3. Alfred Hitchcock
    4. Ingmar Bergman
    5. Launder & Gilliat
    6. Federico Fellini
    7. F.W. Murnau
    8. H.G. Clouzot
    9. Stanley Kubrick
    10. Michael Reeves

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  21. Top 5 Hitch:
    1.Rear window
    2.The birds
    3.North by northwest
    4.Vertigo
    5.Frenzy

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  22. Top five Hitch

    1. Vertigo
    2. Rear Window
    3. Notorious
    4. The Wrong Man
    5. Psycho

    Favorite directors is trickier because I still have so very, very much to learn about the cinema, so this is as rudimentary as a top 10 gets. I'm only really sure about the top 3.

    1. Martin Scorsese
    2. Stanley Kubrick
    3. Ingmar Bergman
    4. Akira Kurosawa
    5. Michael Powell (& Pressburger)
    6. Quentin Tarantino (wouldn't be this high if Inglourious Basterds didn't change my whole view of him)
    7. Jean-Luc Godard
    8. Fritz Lang
    9. Robert Altman
    10. Jim Jarmusch

    Having seen only a few films by Kenji Mizoguchi and Nicholas Ray I can safely say that I probably won't be satisfied with my top 10 until they're on it, but I need to keep going through their works to prove it.

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  23. Just been alerted to this blog by a friend, who's a film noir nut. Superb work, especially your noir list...but no Chinatown? Or is that too 'neo' to be 'noir'?

    Hard to argue with your directors' top 30, although sad to see David Cronenberg miss the cut. He'd top my personal list, just above Hawks, Scorsese, Godard, Keaton and the Coens.

    As for Hitchcock, funnily enough I was writing about Psycho yesterday: [url]http://kinnema.blogspot.com/2010/08/film-of-day-psycho-1960.html[/url]

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  24. 1. Vertigo (1958)
    2. Rear Window (1954)
    3. North by Northwest (1959)
    4. Psycho (1960)
    5. Strangers on a Train (1951)
    6. Notorious (1946)
    7. Shadow of a Doubt (1943)
    8. The Birds (1963)
    9. Dial M for Murder (1954)
    10. Frenzy (1972)
    11. Saboteur (1942)
    12. The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)
    13. The Wrong Man (1956)
    14. Spellbound (1945)
    15. To Catch a Thief (1955)
    16. Marnie (1964)

    I still have a long to go before I make it through his entire filmography, but I am pretty confident in saying that he is also my favorite filmmaker of all time.

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  25. My great List is as follows :
    1 Charles Chaplin and Ingmar Bergman
    2 Carl Theodor Dreyer
    3 Yasujiro Ozu
    4 Robert Bresson
    5 Kenji Mizoguchi
    6 John Ford
    7 F. W. Murnau
    9 Jean Renoir
    8 Luis Bunuel
    9 Buster Keaton
    10 Powell and Pressburger
    11 Satijit Ray
    12. K. Kieslowski
    13 Ernst Lubitsch
    14 Orson Welles
    15 Abel Gance

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  26. Alfred Hitchcock has done lot of good films. he was the son of East End greengrocer William Hitchcock and his wife Emma. Raised as a strict Catholic and attending Saint Ignatius College, a school run by Jesuits, Hitch had very much of a regular upbringing.

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  27. Wow great list follow some step:-
    Steven Spielberg
    Orson Welles
    Sam Peckinpah
    Michael Curtiz
    Joel & Ethan Coen
    Francois Truffaut
    Stanley Kubrick
    Victoria DeSica
    Joseph H. Lewis

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  28. Alfred Hitchcock, destined to make sublime film thrillers, was born in London at the end of the Victorian era.

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  29. It's surprising that Notorious has not fared well in the posted lists.
    My list, for what it's worth is.
    1 Notorious
    2 Vertigo
    3 Psycho
    4 Strangers On A Train
    6 Rear Window
    7 The Birds
    8 Rebecca
    9 Suspicion
    10 Marnie

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  31. My top ten:

    1- Vertigo
    2- Rear window
    3- Spellbound
    4- Rebecca
    5- Foreign correspondent
    6- The birds
    7- North by northwest
    8- Suspicion
    9- Strangers on a train
    10- Psycho

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  32. ´


    'The Wrong Man' is heavily underrated, in my eyes.


    It has always been a favourite of director/critic Francois Truffaut and other European experts like Enno Patalas & Ulrich Gregor.

    And, by the way, 'Wrong Man' is also Hitchcocks most important contribution to the 'Film Noir' genre and deserves without doubt a place in the top ten of any Noir list.


    Below two reviews from the established American film critics Jeffrey Anderson & Dennis Schwartz about 'The Wrong Man':


    http://www.combustiblecelluloid.com/classic/wrongman.shtml

    http://homepages.sover.net/~ozus/wrongman.htm


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